Meeker's
Mechanical
Nature Antiques
Larry and Carole
Meeker

Purveyors of Americana
Patented & Mechanical Antiques
www.AntiqBuyer.com

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Antique & Vintage
Gas / Liquid Fuel Sad Irons

Past Sales Archive

This is just a sample of the many antique irons we have sold.
Click link to see other Sales Archive Pages on this Site.

We can help you sell quality Antiques  Contact Us.

Special Note Concerning Iron Prices: Sad Irons / Pressing Irons Prices are evolving:
After  20 years of steady increases in values, which culminated in a bubble burst, iron prices have now settled back to levels of the past.

Prices seen reflect actual recent sale results from this website or a general price that is more in line w/ today's market.
Irons pictured without prices represent earlier sales whose sale results are outdated and do not accurately reflect current market values. 
Ebay results closely reflect current market values for many sad irons.  Check eBay completed / SOLD results to see current values for many antique irons.

For further info on consigning / selling your antiques with us please see our FAQ page, the Appraisal / Selling Page and the Selling Your Collection Pages.

Our current offering of Antiques for sale are at our sister Website Patented-Antiques.com.



Comfort Revolving Natural Gas Fueled IronThe Comfort Revolving Natural Gas Fueled Iron  The early 1900's was a time period of creative thought and new invention in terms of novel ideas for designs in pressing irons.  The old methods of heating an iron---putting it on the stove to heat it from the outside or heating it with charcoal from within---were replaced with methods such as the one that powered this iron---combustible gas or other liquid fuels.  This example, manufactured by the Comfort Gas Appliance Manufacturing Co. of Boston, Massachusetts, would have been heated by running a flexible hose from a natural gas outlet in the wall to the pipe coming out the back of the iron.  Inside the iron body is a perforated tube within which the mixture of air and gas would burn.  A waffle patterned grid work of metal provided the screening to prevent the waste products of combustion and the flame from shooting outward.  What is unusual about this particular gas iron is its ability to revolve, a feature that allowed for multiple surfaces of the iron body to be used so that the iron could be turned over when the bottom face had cooled.  Given the fact that heat rises, the top face of the body would constantly be heated as the bottom face was being used and cooling.  A spring loaded latching mechanism was attached to the handle to provide for the locking and unlocking of the body.  This iron is in excellent condition with most of the original nickel plating remaining.

Good . . . . .  SOLD


Early Revolving Liquid Fuel IronEarly Revolving Liquid Fuel Iron   This is another example of a revolving / rotating liquid fuel iron.  There is no manufacturer's name on it that I could see, and although it is similar to the iron above there are some differences in the design. It is well made and good looking.  The handle latches and unlatches with no problems, and it revolves as it should.  It is complete with its fuel tank which, although a little crude, appears to be the original.  

Very Good  . . . . . .   SOLD!




Askew Patented Reversible Fuel IronEllyson & Askew Patented Reversible Fuel Iron  Early Patented Revolving irons are extremely hard to find and are in a class all to themselves.  The idea was that because heat rises, the top side of the iron would always be heating as the bottom side that you were using was cooling down---at which point you would release the locking mechanism of the handle and flip the iron around and over to use the other side.  This revolving iron was patented May 4, 1875 and was fueled with burning oil.  Typically whale oil was used in irons from this period.  This iron is complete with its original fuel tank and it is in very nice condition.  There is no rust or pitting, just some nickel loss.  You can still read the patent information stenciled on the sides, something I have never seen on other examples of this iron.  In addition, the top of the tank has the manufacturer's logo and the patent information on it.  A really nice example of a very hard to find iron!

Good . . . . .  SOLD



crocfarn revolving ironEarly Crocker & Farnsworth Revolving Alcohol Fuel Iron   Here's an early revolving fuel iron that is not very often found, and which showed up on an internet auction a while back.  This iron was patented on March 20, 1877 and hails from Buffalo, NY. Somehow this example found its way to Southern Alabama, and now happily resides in Northern California.  

Good . . . . .   SOLD



revolving fuel ironEarly Revolving Alcohol or Whale Oil Iron  Here's another oil fired iron.  These are early and pretty hard to find.

Good . . . . .   SOLD






"Perfect" Revolving Alcohol or Whale Oil Iron"Perfect" Revolving Alcohol or Whale Oil Iron    These revolving oil fired irons are early and pretty hard to find.  Many were before the time of petroleum and were fired or fueled with whale oil.  They had large tanks with a large wick the burned like a lamp.  This one is missing it rear tank.

Good . . . . .  SOLD





Revolving Gas IronEarly Revolving / Rotating Liquid Fuel Iron   The late 1800's and early 1900's was a period of creative thought, new invention, and novel ideas for designs in pressing irons. The old methods of heating an iron---putting it on the stove or heating it with charcoal---were replaced with methods such as the one that powered this iron---combustible gas, alcohol, whale oil, or other liquid fuels. 

What is unusual about this liquid fuel iron is its ability to revolve, a feature that allowed for multiple surfaces of the iron body to be used so that the iron could be turned over when the bottom face had cooled. Given the fact that heat rises, the top face would constantly be heated as the bottom face was being used and cooling. A latching mechanism attached to the handle provided for the locking and unlocking of the body.

This iron appears to be unmarked as to maker, but is very similar to irons produced under the names "Ellyson Bros." and "Ellyson & Askew".  It is in excellent condition with much of its original gold wash finish and nickel plating remaining underneath a bit of surface "grime" that appears would clean off fairly easily, however its rear mounting fuel tank has gone missing. That may explain the exceptional condition of this iron as it looks to have never been fired or used.  A rare iron!

Very Good  . . . . . .  SOLD!




Revolving Rotary Gas IronRevolving Rotary Patented Fuel Iron   This is yet another example of a revolving gas iron, this one marked with the name "Rotary Smoothing Iron New York" on one side and an 1854 patent date---which is really early---on the other.  The latching mechanism releases to allow the iron to revolve, then locks it into place in the new position. 

Very Good  . . . . . .  SOLD!






revolving fuel iron2 Revolving Natural Gas Irons  Big and Small.  Both are equally hard to find.  Sorry about the blurry pic.   

Good . . . . .   SOLD






Tailor-size Imperial Gas IronHuge Tailor-size Imperial Gas Iron  These tailor's size gas irons are really impressive looking!  This 20 pound Imperial is in great shape---nice bold casting on the top, a great looking tank.  It will look great on display, especially next to a smaller iron.  I guarantee it's the kind of iron that people will take notice of!

Good . . . . .  SOLD







The Ideal Sad IronIdeal Sad Iron Mfg. Co. Gas Iron  Hailing from Cleveland, Ohio The Ideal Sad Iron Mfg. Co. manufactured this gas iron, putting their name and the patent date of Mar. 5, 1901 on the protective heat shield.  Other than producing this particular model, the company probably didn't do a whole lot more, as I have never seen any other irons marked with that company's name, and the only reference I could find to it was in Esther's Berney's comprehensive out-of-print book, The Collector's Guide to Pressing Irons.   These seldom-found models and variations of pressing irons are what make collecting so much fun!

Good . . . . .  SOLD




Patented-Antiques Antique Pressing Iron SalesKeystone Natural Gas Iron   This is an unusual maker and not an iron we have seen before.  It hails from Pennsylvania and is a bit unusual in the handle design. Different, and very nicely made!!

Fine. . . . . .  SOLD!

 




Patented-Antiques Antique Pressing Iron SalesNatural Gas Iron    There are a few natural gas irons that are similar to this one---the Colt, the Clefton, etc.  I'm not sure exactly which one this is.

Fine. . . . . .   SOLD!





Pacific Peerless Liquid Fuel / Gas Pressing Iron"Pacific Peerless" Liquid Fuel / Gas Pressing Iron   This is one of the rarest Liquid Fuel / Gas Irons to be found.  The overall condition of this rare sadiron is excellent.  There are less than 1/2 dozen examples of this style iron known.  Marked versions known have the name "Pacific Peerless" or "New York FlatIron Company" on the rear nickeled plate / tank holder.  This example is unmarked and I believe is from a first production run before the inventor / designer sold the manufacturing rights to either company mentioned. 

This style iron is not pictured in any of the references on antique sad / pressing irons. Those that have been discovered have been marked 2 different ways, or not at all, as this one is.  The body design was also changed slightly but the distinctive fuel tank and handle design remained the same on all found.  The overall design resembles a steam locomotive, with the elongated cylinder shape brass fuel tank mounted on top of the base.

The first example to turn up came from the Glissman iron collection and we sold that one over 10 years ago.  The next came from a Texas collection and was sold at auction about 10 years ago.  It was marked with a New York Flat Iron Company NY and Patents Pending.   It was not marked Peerless.  It had the same body design w/ hundreds of holes in the body as this example does.   Last year we got a different variation from a  collection in Idaho that was marked differently and had a different body design.  It was marked "Pacific Peerless" and as being from CA.  The markings indicated that Patents were pending for it also.  Its body design was slightly different, being solid with a series of  round holes and mica windows along the top edge.   That example can be viewed looking through our past sale archives at our site www.AntiqBuyer.com.    Highly recommended!!

Good +  . . . . . . .      SOLD!



BACK

This is just a sample of the many antique pressing irons we have sold.
Click link to see other Sales Archive Pages on this Site.

We can help you sell quality Antiques  Contact Us.

For further info on consigning / selling your antiques with us please see our FAQ page, the Appraisal / Selling Page and the Selling Your Collection Pages.

Our current offering of Antiques for sale are at our sister Website Patented-Antiques.com.


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(1998 - 2015)
Larry & Carole Meeker